Prader-Willi Syndrome: gateway to understanding obesity and mental illness

Kathlene Jones's picture

The Prader-Willi Syndrome is a rare genetic condition affecting the whole of a person physically, intellectually and emotionally. Kathlene Jones, whose daughter was born with the syndrome, explains why research into Prader-Willi could potentially change lives of all individuals struggling with obesity, anxiety and other mental illnesses.

10 years, 100 friends, $10,000 for research to honour a lost loved one at Mother’s Day Classic

Belinda Hendriksen's picture

The Mother's Day Classic walk or run for breast cancer research started from modest beginnings as a walk in the park and has grown into a major national community event. Belinda Hendriksen is a Victorian mother and team captain for more than 100 walkers who will represent Kerry Team 10/100 in this year's Mother’s Day Classic.

If I were the Federal Treasurer...

Belinda Lucas's picture

On the weekend Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie announced that she’d like to see foreign aid slashed in this year’s federal budget as pensioners are doing it tough and need the money we're spending on overseas aid. International development specialist Belinda Lucas begs to differ.

Why influence is a competitive advantage

Michelle Gibbings's picture

In our work environment shaped by technological disruption we are expected to deliver more results in a faster time frame and with less resources. Michelle Gibbings has a strategy to get things done and make change happen.

Fossil fuel divestment: Why Australia’s uni students are turning the other cheek

Damian Gill's picture

Students across Australia are staging bold actions at their universities to demand divestment from fossil fuels. Why do the issues of climate change and fossil fuel investment resonate so strongly with university students? It’s about equality and justice, explains Damian Gill.

One BarbeCURE at a time

Victoria Kvisle's picture

Philanthropy is already a way of life for many individuals and businesses in Australia. Victoria Kvisle, whose family has been involved with Cure Cancer for almost fifty years, encourages us all to find a way to serve and care for those around us.