Space

| November 7, 2017

Commercial space services have become major global industries, spearheading technological advance, social change and economic growth.

The recent announcement by the Australian Government in support of a national space agency gives hope that Australia can claw back the vast distance that has grown between us, and our peers, in this area.

With limited resources available on Earth it would seem pertinent that we look to those available elsewhere. With the growth of commercial rockets, through SpaceX, Virgin Galactic and XCOR ,the reality of being able to tap in to these resources are tangible.

Brian Cox, the global science sensation currently touring Australia, confirmed on the 7:30 Report that space is “undoubtedly one of the growth industries” and that we should get on board supporting a national space agency.

Commercial space services have become major global industries, spearheading technological advance, social change and economic growth. With modest government and industry support, Australia could develop a globally competitive domestic space industry worth up to AU$3 billion a year in export revenue and creating 5,000 new high-tech jobs by 2027. The Australian Government is the largest customer of space-derived information and so has most to gain from cheaper, more secure domestic services.

I welcome your comments on the exciting developments in this area. Please contact me on editor@openforum.com.au if you have an article you would like to share.

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One Comment

  1. Alan Stevenson

    Alan Stevenson

    August 12, 2018 at 4:24 pm

    The concept of exploration of space and the use we put to the near space around us (communication, GPS, telescopes, etc) is very exiting. I wonder what readers think of the idea put forward recently by the United States of having a space force? When the US initiated its space progran, the then president stated that this was a peaceful activity. The thought that we might have wars fought there was pure science fiction.

    I accept that we have spy satelites orbiting the planet while at the same time reluctantly accepting that most of the people who have walked on the Moon were military personnel. Hopefully any landings on Mars will be achieved by qualified scientists instead of partially trained airforce personnel. India has shown that it has the right attitude to space exploration; the Chinese will almost certainly use their PLA people who appear to be more broadly based than those of the US but will carry a heavy political burden. To date, Europe does not appear to be particularly interested in a scientific team on another planet although a number of vaguely qualified civilians have already signed up to being part of a permanent base there.

    Your thoughts on the eventual makeup of a manned expedition to Mars would be of interest.

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