• Economy Politics and Policy

    Too often our leaders wait and wait


    Victor Perton |  July 27, 2017


    “Credibility is a precious commodity. A stock of it is created by persistently offering simple, clear advice that recognises a policy shift is on, and explains why – and where the national interest lies.” Chairman of Australia’s Productivity Commission Peter Harris said in a challenging speech entitled Productivity and Policy Challenges in an Environment of Pervasive Uncertainty delivered at the Economic and Social Outlook Conference on 20 July 2017 in Melbourne.


  • Economy Health Society

    Engaging large employers in return-to-work strategies


    Catherine Fritz-Kalish |  July 25, 2017


    The Second Roundtable in the GAP Recovery at Work series focused on strategies to encourage recovery at work after soft tissue injuries and how to ‘Engage Large Employers in Best Practice’. Catherine Fritz-Kalish, Managing Director of Global Access Partners, releases the 2017 Roundtable findings through Open Forum.


  • Culture Science and Technology

    Medium sized businesses weak link in National Cyber Defence


    Aiden Tudehope |  July 21, 2017


    The leadership of medium sized businesses and government agencies is falling dangerously short in understanding and managing cyber security, potentially creating risks across the economy and society. Managing Director of Macquarie Government & Hosting Group, Aiden Tudehope discusses the 2016 research by the Macquarie Telecom Group.


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  • Uncategorized

    Aussie ingenuity

    proberts     |      November 6, 2007

    Australians are innovative – you hear people say that all the time. But the reality is far less palatable.

    I am often told ‘Australians are innovative’ but in reality we are not, or rather not particularly.

     

    We are innovative in the sense that people are innovative, and Australians are people. So it follows that Australians are innovative.

    But how could we be particularly innovative – we are not even that well educated. A third of Australians aged 25 to 34 are tertiary educated compared to 53 per cent of Canadians, for example.

     

    Science isn’t the problem as we perform well in academic research. The problem is turning ideas into profitable businesses. Patents are one of the most important indicators of that process and with two per cent of the global economy, we account for only 0.82 per cent of global patents.

     

    We don’t need to be particularly innovative as most of our industries are classified as ‘medium-technology’ and almost none are ‘high technology’. And the situation is not getting relatively better – our high technology exports are growing at 4.4 per cent a year compared to the OECD average of 7.2 per cent.

     

  • Uncategorized

    A standards strategy measures up to global trade challenges

    admin     |      November 2, 2007

    Mark BezzinaWith the recent explosion of ground-breaking standardised ICT protocols we are witnessing the ever increasing development of wealth-producing technologies and business models.  These business models exploit easily accessible and interoperable global networks, information and knowledge.   

    Underlying most technologies and business models is the ubiquitous and somewhat ephemeral world of standards.  Standards support wealth creation by enabling the development of global production networks characterized by outsourcing, the de-verticalization of corporate structure, and new forms of “technological fusion” in which disparate technologies are brought together to achieve new products that exhibit novel performance characteristics and functionality. 

    The nature of this global techno-economic system places a premium on interoperability and creates a new level of demand for acceptable standards.  Standards have also become increasingly important for the international economy and according to the World Trade Organisation underlie 80% of world trade in the exchange of goods and services. They form a fundamental part of bi-lateral and multi-lateral trade agreements.

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    Plurality of Identities, and trouble ahead with biometrics

    StephenWilson     |      November 1, 2007

    The idea of biometric authentication plays straight into the view that each user has one "true" identity underpinning multiple authorisations.  

     I recently noted in the thread on identities and keys that: [We need] identity frameworks (like the Microsoft developed Identity Metasystem aka Cardspace) that permit as many "identities" as there are contexts in which we assert ourselves.

    We are in the midst (I hope!) of a shift to a new paradigm based on a plurality of identities. And I think I'm using the over-wrought "p word" here in its proper context. The current "singular identity" paradigm has had a deep and unhelpful influence over the way we think about all sorts of things, including smartcards, PKI, biometrics, the semantic debate over "authentication" versus "authorisation", and therefore the underlying architecture of many approaches to federation.