• How will the arts recover from COVID-19?

    Paul Rae     |      May 24, 2020

    Working with the limitations and opportunities of online interfaces, artists whose careers survive the pandemic will emerge with an altered sense of what they do, and of their place in society.

  • Shots fired in the culture wars

    Heidi Harrington Johnson     |      February 10, 2020

    UNSW Associate Professor Lizzie Muller is urging the arts sector to come together to fight for the arts in schools after the federal arts department was amalgamated into another portfolio.

  • Art is good for your health

    Open Forum     |      December 28, 2019

    Regular visits to museums, art galleries, the theatre or concerts is linked to a longer life, according to a new study in Britain.

  • What happens when we look at art?

    Open Forum     |      November 21, 2019

    Rather than judge artworks on their own merits, we are influenced by those around them, highlighting the importance of careful curation in exhibitions and galleries.

  • Sculpture by the sea

    Olga Gerloff     |      October 29, 2019

    The biggest outdoor public art exhibition in the world is back on the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk in the eastern suburbs of Sydney. This year’s festival features more than 100 sculptures by Australian and international artists, including several pieces by local arts students.

  • Power, politics and art

    James Arvanitakis     |      August 17, 2019

    James Arvanitakis and Alix Beattie of Western Sydney University argue that the hostile reaction to a controversial Bondi mural highlights the rise of a new conservative political correctness.

  • The perfection of David

    Christopher Marshall     |      July 7, 2019

    Michelangelo’s statue of David is the world’s most famous statement on physical perfection, and continues to inspire the next generation of artists 400 years after its creation.

  • Can we separate well made art from badly behaved artists?

    Janna Thompson     |      June 24, 2019

    The history of art is full of great artists who were cruel, exploitative, prejudiced or predatory. Can their work be judged independently of their creators?

  • Tony Costa wins the 2019 Archibald Prize

    Joanna Mendelssohn     |      May 12, 2019

    Tony Costa’s portrait of fellow artist Lindy Lee has won the 2019 Archibald Prize, one of Australia’s most important and prestigious art awards.

  • How creativity can help us cultivate moral imagination

    Elizabeth Reid Boyd     |      January 31, 2019

    Whether it’s a painting, or a patchwork quilt, when we create something, we step into the future, we trust in the destiny of our own creations. We learn to trust that we can create our own reality.

  • Money doesn’t talk, it swears

    Max Haiven     |      November 3, 2018

    At a time when spoiled billionaires seem to get anything they want, Banksy’s act of vengeance can appear deeply satisfying, but there is more going on here than a simple loathing of the rich and powerful.

  • The science of the plot twist: How writers exploit our brains

    Vera Tobin     |      July 22, 2018

    Human cognitive tendencies help explain why plot twists can be so satisfying. But somewhat counterintuitively, they also explain why knowing about a plot twist ahead of time – the dreaded “spoiler” – doesn’t really spoil the experience at all.