• Business

    Brainstorm not group think


    Sabrina Habib |  May 18, 2022


    As automation and artificial intelligence encroaches ever further on the world of work, human creativity is more important than ever and companies can use a range of approaches to maximising the group production of ideas – including GAP’s Second Track process.


  • Resilience

    Disaster resilience should be an election issue


    Markus Höllerer |  May 18, 2022


    After three years of fires and floods, the federal election should have offered an opportunity to promote plans for improving national disaster governance and resilience.


  • Politics and Policy

    State of play


    Paul Williams |  May 18, 2022


    Six experts analyse the state of play between the two main parties across the country as the federal election campaign nears its climax this weekend.


Latest Story

  • Learning defence lessons from Ukraine

    Peter Jennings     |      May 17, 2022

    The West refused to accept Ukraine into NATO, sell it arms to defend itself, or fight by its side against the Russian invasion, but now the Western powers, including Australia, are learning valuable lessons in winning a modern war against a major opponent.

  • Managing Australia’s software security threat

    Sarah Sloan     |      May 17, 2022

    As our world becomes increasingly digitised and connected, attacks on software supply chains are only set to increase, particularly by hostile nations such as Russia and China on defence and security contractors.

  • Platform pitfalls

    Fabio Morreale     |      May 17, 2022

    The power of platforms to suggest content we may like is a boon for convenience, but secrecy around data collection raises some troubling questions.

  • Bringing Russia’s war criminals to justice

    Solon Solomon     |      May 16, 2022

    Some of the Russian troops who have murdered, raped and plundered their way across Ukraine have been captured and will be put on trial by Ukraine, but Russia has no intention of investigating its own wrong doing and the stone-faced leaders who ordered this terrible war may never face justice.

  • Young Australian voters should care about foreign policy

    Dominic Simonelli     |      May 16, 2022

    Rather than being an afterthought at the ballot box, young voters should demand well-crafted foreign policy that’s fit for purpose in building a safe, prosperous and democratic world.

  • Mining the Moon and Mars

    Neil Martin     |      May 16, 2022

    Off-earth mining may once have been purely the stuff of science fiction, but now it’s potentially a US$1 trillion industry that is likely to be vital if humans are serious about colonising Mars or the Moon.

  • Why your vote matters

    Intifar Chowdhury     |      May 15, 2022

    Australian citizens have to vote whether they like it or not, but just as little drops make a mighty ocean, every individual vote contributes a stronger democracy.

  • Exile on Main Street at fifty

    Dean Biron     |      May 15, 2022

    The Rolling Stones released Exile on Main Street half a century ago, and, as anyone who’s listened to the radio over the last 10 years will attest, it still blows the competition away.

  • David v Goliath – How Ukraine has held off Russia

    Liam Collins     |      May 14, 2022

    Having refused to arm or fight for Ukraine, or allow it to join the EU and NATO, the West expected Ukraine to fold quickly to a Russian invasion, but inspired leadership, incredible courage, modern western weapons and a willingness to learn from past mistakes have humiliated Vladimir Putin and his lumbering hordes.

  • Seven sustainable solutions for aged care

    Victoria Tichá     |      May 14, 2022

    A balance between public and private financing is needed to achieve sustainable aged care funding models, says UNSW Business School’s Michael Sherris.

  • Multiverse madness

    Ben Knight     |      May 14, 2022

    Fans of Michael Moorcock are well acquainted with the concept of a ‘multiverse’, but a quantum mechanics interpretation can help the less literary inclined comprehend the hypothetical existence of many worlds.

  • Paper tigers on parade

    Frank Ledwidge     |      May 13, 2022

    The problems dogging Russia’s botched invasion of Ukraine are rooted in its disfunctional society as much as the technical shortcomings of weapons which look better on paper than they work in the field.