• Snarky tweets and national security

    Tim Watts     |      October 3, 2019

    The most common form of interference in democratic elections isn’t direct tampering with results but disinformation campaigns to undermine candidates, increase polarisation and reduce public trust in institutions.

  • That Instagram post may cost you more than you think

    Chris Culnane     |      August 23, 2019

    We don’t really know how social media posts are being used or evaluated by banks. We need greater transparency around exactly how our data will be used and the ability to challenge decisions.

  • Twitter and Facebook counter China’s information onslaught

    Jake Wallis     |      August 22, 2019

    The bans on Chinese propaganda accounts by Twitter and Facebook highlights how the Chinese government uses media power to shape the narrative and project its own interests.

  • The problems of policing the post-Christchurch internet

    Open Forum     |      June 29, 2019

    The Australian Parliament has passed legislation to punish social media platforms showing violent videos, but is the reaction to the Christchurch massacre right in principle and can it be effective in practice?

  • Facebook’s new crush on its users

    Open Forum     |      June 21, 2019

    The social media giant is entering the dating app market, but will it be seen as yet another invasion of privacy or a fun way to help shy people get together?

  • The social media “own goals” of young athletes

    Megan Maurice     |      June 5, 2019

    Social media offers budding and elite athletes a shortcut to celebrity, but the price of building a public persona can be all too high for rising stars still finding their feet in real life.

  • How second hand social media profiling can target you

    Open Forum     |      January 23, 2019

    A new study has found that people can be accurately profiled by using data from their friends’ accounts, even when they have deleted their own social media.