• Supporting technology in Australia’s public sector

    Lesley Seebeck     |      April 3, 2021

    There is no silver bullet to improve government technology, but new funding measures will help modernise its systems and services and position the public service for a world of increasing digitalisation and technological competition.

  • Budget rules erode Australian government’s capacity to embrace technology

    Lesley Seebeck     |      March 9, 2021

    Digital technology is intrinsic to government operations and service delivery and the government’s interactions with citizens. The government has to learn to be a smart and savvy manager of technology in a world of accelerating technological competition while overcoming its own fragility and emaciation.

  • Avoiding the technology trap

    Lesley Seebeck     |      December 9, 2020

    At a recent Australian e-commerce summit, Prime Minister Scott Morrison praised technology adoption – rather than domestic innovation – as a means of driving economic returns.

  • Surviving in a world of sharper technological competition

    Lesley Seebeck     |      February 18, 2020

    The sooner Australia comes to grips with technology’s reshaping of the world, the better we will be able to adapt, act and secure our future within it.

  • People are not the problem in cyber-security

    Lesley Seebeck     |      November 5, 2019

    The slow work of building human capability and a systems-level understanding is likely to yield better results in cyber-security than firing staff who make mistakes or micromanaging individual activity.

  • Why the fifth domain is different

    Lesley Seebeck     |      September 6, 2019

    Cyber-warfare has joined land, sea, air and space as a domain of global conflict. Rather than continuing to talk about simply operating in the fifth domain, we should be thinking about shaping it, and shaping it to our interests.

  • The universal acid of cyber

    Lesley Seebeck     |      October 10, 2018

    To address cyber issues, we need fewer blunt instruments such as legislative, system-wide interventions and more adaptive, targeted instruments attuned to the disparate and changing nature of the system.