• Russia and China’s different tacks on information warfare

    Jake Wallis     |      September 30, 2019

    Both Russia and China use social media and propaganda to subvert democratic nations, but they go about their task in different ways.

  • The Saudi oil strike shows the new way of war

    Malcolm Davis     |      September 20, 2019

    Australia’s defence planners must learn the lessons the attack on Abqaiq teach us about the risks of sticking with traditional mindsets and maintaining old paradigms in the face of rapid changes in warfare.

  • A century on: remembering the Australians who fought in the Russian Civil War

    David Sutton     |      September 8, 2019

    The Russian Civil War killed as many as 10 million people and the Bolshevik victory gave a bloody birth to the Soviet state. Small numbers of Western forces fought the communists, including a handful of Australians in the wake of the Great War.

  • Would cockroaches really survive a nuclear war?

    Kate Stanton     |      February 25, 2019

    Cockroaches have a reputation for resilience, even when it comes to surviving a nuclear bomb and radiation – but would they really outlive us all? Exposed to radiation, cockroaches fare worse than the humble fruit fly.

  • Australia faces an unprecedented set of security challenges

    Albert Palazzo     |      August 17, 2018

    The international security environment is on the cusp of significant change and the national defence debate must be broadened thematically yet narrowed geographically if the ADF is to protect Australian people.

  • Alliances in the time of hybrid warfare

    Huong Le Thu     |      July 15, 2018

    The US–Australia partnership must develop in this time of increasing super-power competition to take account of the changing forms and complexities of tactics and warfare.

  • Defence must adapt fast, or fail

    Brendan Nicholson     |      July 9, 2018

    The overwhelming speed of technological development means armed forces must change their approach to everything from who they recruit and train to how targets are attacked and how a nation defends itself.

  • An army is made of its people

    Brendan Nicholson     |      July 7, 2018

    The 100th anniversary of the Battle of Hamel has been remembered as the first time American troops fought under an Australian general and a textbook study of how to plan an attack. However the individual stories from the battle underline the fact that an army is only as good as its people.

  • Assessing the submarine threat to Australia

    Mike Scrafton     |      July 5, 2018

    Is the Commonwealth’s purchase of 9 anti-submarine frigates to protect Australian waters from foreign submarines or to offer support to our allies against Chinese aggression in the South China Sea?

  • Bringing to light what goes on in the shadows

    Brendan Nicholson     |      June 15, 2018

    Allegations of appalling behaviour by a small number of Australian special forces soldiers accused of killing unarmed prisoners in Afghanistan must be properly investigated but also raise questions about the overuse of special forces compared to infantry personnel.

  • When muscles trump morals: The politics of ‘manliness’

    Stephanie Lawson     |      April 29, 2018

    Donald Trump openly boasts about his power over women and his political opponents, but what role does this ‘macho’ approach leave for morality in leadership?