• Culture

    Legal parentage and surrogacy – more inconsistency?


    Cressida Limon |  February 20, 2018


    Confusion around legal parentage and surrogacy arrangements is continuing to cause conflict between Australian domestic public policy in relation to ‘commercial surrogacy’ and the child’s best interests. UWS law lecturer Dr Cressida Limon explores recent developments.


  • Economy Politics and Policy

    Solutions to Australia’s housing affordability woes


    Derek Grima |  February 16, 2018


    Housing affordability continues to be a key issue in Australian cities. Founding Director of BeFinancial and CPA ‘changemaker’ Derek Grima looks at action that government and individuals can take to face ongoing housing affordability challenges.


  • Health

    Blueprint maps out how to give Australians a 21st century health system


    Alison Verhoeven |  February 15, 2018


    The recent report released by Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association maps out how to transform our healthcare system into a fit-for-purpose 21st century system. Alison Verhoeven, Chief Executive of AHHA, advocates for the immediate roll out the recommendations.


Latest Story

  • Uncategorized

    The electronic grapevine and the great information noise

    tamaraplakalo     |      December 11, 2007

     

    Social media is changing the nature of information exchange, but it is information itself that is suffering an identity crisis.

     

    If Marshall McLuhan’s global village is to be understood as a toponym for a digitally connected world, then social media have to be seen as a cross between a village meeting point and its informal information (ie gossip) network. 

  • Uncategorized

    A mandate from “the Australian people”?

    editor     |      December 5, 2007

    Philip ArgyBy Philip Argy

    Without detracting from the new Government's victory, the media really does a poor job in reporting facts.  With a 5% to 6% swing from the Coalition to Labor, it means that 94% to 95% of voters voted exactly the same as they did in 2004.  Out of about 13.5 million voters, that means around 800,000 people changed their vote.  But of those, some were in electorates where a swing of that magnitude didn't change the result becuase the incumbent had a greater margin, and in others most of the swing was 'absorbed' by the margin, so that the no. of votes that actually determined the outcome of the election were probably less than 100,000 across the country, and perhaps even as few as 20,000.  Ultimately you have to wait for the results to be formally declared and then see by how many votes the ALP candidate won in the aggregate across the seats that changed hands to change the majority in the House of Reps.

    In an average electorate of 80,000 voters a 5% swing is 4,000 votes.  Very few seats were wrested with a margin of that magnitude, so at the end of the day, what are we to make of it all?  In Bennelong, for example, it has been suggested that there is a large enough Chinese community that if they all found appealing the idea of having a Prime Minister who could speak mandarin, and they voted for Labor as a consequence, that was enough to unseat the PM.  We may never know, but language like landslide and overwhelming mandate and suggestions that the Howard government was despised don't seem apt to me given the facts.

  • Uncategorized

    The changing focus of innovation

    proberts     |      December 4, 2007

    The focus of innovation changes, but how many of our businesses have moved on?

    It comes as a surprise the first time you are driving along in a new car and the dashboard lights come on by themselves, or the windscreen wipers start up, or the car helps you turn that tricky corner. But the greater level of intelligence of our cars shown in these autonomous systems is just the outward manifestation of the latest model of innovation.

     

    When the Model T ruled, the average car was a marvel of the era of mechanical engineering. Japanese cars first got traction when they offered the goodies of the electronics era in the form of the push button radio and two speed wipers.

     

    Today we take for granted the engineering and the electronics and are deep into the era where software is the key to the customer experience and value adding.

     

    Software accounts for a greater and greater proportion of value in today’s products. In a car it works with us when we apply the brakes, helps us maintain the right line and stay level when driving through a corner, and controls myriad systems from air conditioning to valve timing.

  • Uncategorized

    Losses of personal information, trust and privacy: This is going to change your life

    Malcolm Crompton     |      December 1, 2007

    We are watching a very rapid change in community attitudes on privacy.  One of the strongest contributors is the repeated and significant loss of control of personal information by private and public sector organisations around the world.

  • Uncategorized

    Croatians get cranky with diaspora vote

    tamaraplakalo     |      November 26, 2007

    Last weekend, Australians voted in another election — the Croatian one, causing some serious electoral crankiness abroad.

     

    As Australia strode into its first post-ALP-win Sunday, my eyes and ears opened to another election day, this one some 18,000 kilometres away – in Croatia.

     

    The said election was, in fact, not as far away as it may seem, given that Saturday was the day all dual citizens of Croatia in Australia could vote to keep the incumbent conservative Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ)-led government in power, or give the new mandate to its archrivals – the Social Democratic Party (SDP). For anyone who knows anything about the Croatian political environment, the previous sentence was a moment in a TV skit where audience should have been prompted to laugh.

     

    Let me explain. The eleventh electoral unit, also known as the diaspora vote, is what in Australian political terms would be described as a “safe seat”, no matter where its boundaries begin (Bosnia and Herzegovina), or where they end (New Zealand). Almost as one, they vote HDZ (the current election count has the HDZ diaspora vote at 76,53 per cent), with other conservatives and a few independents picking up the rest of the vote.